"I love bikes with a soul, swoopy graceful lines are more my style and I want my bikes to be just a little different then what the next rider has under them. For me Pinarello meets my standards." -Amos

Sure they make top level bikes raced at the biggest events in road cycling but for most of us that is not enough. It does mean that they have put in the time to make the bikes ready for the best riders to push to the limits, so you can be sure they are light weight, responsive with their handling and strong enough not to break under the strongest riders pedaling.

I just want a little more than that. With all the bikes I have had they all have been light, handled well and have lasted for what I consider to be their working lifetime. But they lacked one thing, style. The little details like the wavey Onda 2 fork, though functional appeal to my eye more than the straight forks so common now. The paint job is just simple, other colors are available but just a few pin strips.

A more traditional look with a nearly level top tube and ten sizes available, so a proper fit is important. Come by and try one out.

Pinarello F8 Review

by Amos Brumble, Owner of Brumble Bikes

Above: Pinarello F8 built by Amos for a customer

Last week had a Pinarello demo day. We are firm believers in selling proven equipment and we also want our customers to ride new and different bikes in real-world scenarios. Considering Pinarello has won numerous Grand Tours we knew we had a good, solid bike for our clients to try.

We had about 8 customers demo a Pinarello. On hand were the entry-level complete race bike the Marvel (which we also reviewed), A Prince, A dogma and the new Dogma F8 (referred to the F8). Most bikes were complete with Campy EPS or Dura Ace with Fulcrum Race 1 wheels. So everyone was in for a well-made, race-ready, tour-proven bike.

I myself had the F8 with Campy Super Record EPS and Fulcrum Racing wheels. Also spec’d on this bike was Pinarello’s one piece bar/stem – the MOST Talon Carbon Road bar.

Our ride was an over 30 mile loop with some varying road surfaces, a few slow rising climbs and one short, but steep 10% gradient quick climb. Before and after the ride I spent some time in a large empty church parking lot doing figure eights and quick turns to get a feeling for the handling. My normal race bike is a Team CCB Specialized SL4 with Dura Ace Di2 – so this was a good chance for me to try a different frame with Campy EPS and a one piece bar stem (something I always wanted to try).

The F8 frame itself is a snappy ride and is plenty stiff and the race proven geometry worked with no issue. The bike went where I wanted it to go. Just as important: it was a quiet ride. There was no rattling and the mounting of EPS was spot on. This was one of the most silent bikes I have ever ridden. I did endurance, tempo and sprint paces a few times and the F8 felt comfortable in all paces and scenarios. When the hill hit 10% I noticed no wheel rub nor felt any frame flex – this was a solid race bike of top quality. The Campy Record EPS worked as advertised and electronic shifting is the future and I have been racing and training year round on it for 4 years with zero failures . If I had to pick over Campy Record EPS or Dura Ace di2 I would give a small edge to di2 but that is only if you want to get picky. The campy shifting worked, but there were slight differences between the gears whereas di2 is uniform throughout.

One piece bar and stem combos have always interested me and I’ve always wanted to try one. I enjoyed the Pinarello Talon, however, the angle and shape at the bend from the tops to the drops was too much and the result was it didn’t give the clearance I wanted. As such it wouldn’t really work for me.

So how does the F8 stack up? In three words: I loved it. It’s a pure race bike, it looks great with great lines and good paint. My long time riding buddy, Conner, had an Specialized SL2 and after riding the F8 he didn’t even want to ride his SL2 home. To him it was that good. I myself saw no shortcomings on the bike itself – though, as noted, I would not use the one piece bar and would give a small edge to di2. The F8 frame itself, was fantastic.

If you’re interested give me a call at the shop and let’s talk about the F8 and other bikes that might be good for you.

Hall of Fame

2015 Sir Bradley Wiggins - Bolide HR

London - June 7, 2015, Sir Bradley Wiggins destroys the Hour record with the BOLIDE HR: 54.526 km/hr is the new benchmark! It's time for a new hour record, and Pinarello put on the field the BOLIDE HR to make Sir Bradley Wiggins fly at 54,526 km/h during one faboulos hour. Pinarello is one more time the fastest bike in the World.

2013 Chris Froome - Dogma 65.1 Think 2

Paris - July 21, 2013, The white Kenyan wins the tenth Tour de France in the history of Pinarello. What had been announced in the 2012 Tour, comes promptly true in 2013. Chris Froome, already imposing in 2012 as Bradley Wiggins' domestique, takes the rank of captain, dominating and winning the 2013 Tour de France. Backed as always by a super team and the faithful and gregarious Ritchie Porte, Froome dominates the grand boucle and writes history, marking the tenth victory for Pinarello in the Tour de France.

2013 Alberto Rui Costa - Dogma 65.1 Think 2

Florence - September 29, 2013, Thanks to Alberto Rui Costa, a Pinarello bike wins its first World Championship! The UCI Road World Championships in Italy is the best occasion to win the only trophy missing: the World Championship. The most beautiful thing is that the Raimbow Jersey was won by the team of Eusebio Unzue. A partnership lasting 30 years, full of extraordinary victories: the Tour de France, Vuelta de Espana, Giro d'Italia, UCI Rankings...the collaboration finishes this year with the icing on the cake: the World Championship.

1994 Miguel Indurain - Espada Carbon

Bordeaux - September 2, 1994, Miguel Indurain takes the Hour Record on a Pinarello! Miguel Indurain for Pinarello is more than an athlete who rode on our bikes, Miguel is one of the family. Born on our bikes, he marked an era of unique cycling in the '90s, literally dominating 5 consecutive Tour de France, 2 Giro d'Italia, winning all the time trials, scoring the Hour Record, and double-tapping the victory to the World Championship. Miguel Indurain is in the Cycling Hall of Fame. He was elected Spanish Athlete of the twentieth century and World Sportsman of the Year in 1992 and 1993.